The end of my first week of clinics….

Endoscopy Gutteral Pouch Empyema in Horses

Today’s Diary Entry is sponsored by Supreme Pet Foods

What a week! I am actually starting to feel like a vet student now and not only have started to apply knowledge that I have learnt over the past year but also from my previous degree! In addition to this I have also managed to pass two exams this week (Veterinary Physiology on Wednesday and Animal Hygiene this morning)!!!

So this morning started with an exam, it still feels weird to me having to dress formal for exams however dressing smart also gives me a boost of confidence so I do like it. I now have a week to prepare for my Anatomy exam on the 24th June – this will be my second attempt as I failed my first one back in January as I had no clue what to expect on the question paper. Basically you are expected to just list the different parts of the bone instead of trying to write a description of how it looks 🙂 Hopefully I will do better this time!

Now this week has been pretty cool, I’ve got through a lot of Equine stuff, seen a castration, endoscopy, and wound management. Today I was slightly gutted as I arrived late after this mornings exam to find that they had done emergency surgery on a corneal ulcer (a ulcer of the eye) in a sports horse. I arrived just in time to see the movement of the horse from the operating table to the recovery box. This was interesting as when animals wake up from anaesthetic they are unsteady on their feet (same in humans but we have the ability to know what is going on and that we should lay there) and usually struggle to stand. On Tuesday for example the horse was held on the ground until he had recovered enough to stand, and then was supported with people at the head and tail vertebra. The rest of today’s surgery went to the wound management of the hoof injuries, and endoscopy lavage for the guttural pouch empyema (the bump in the image below is a large swollen abscess).

Endoscopy Gutteral Pouch Empyema in HorsesStandard treatment for corneal ulcers is applying a graft which helps healing whilst also preventing the eye from rupturing, and whilst I missed this I got to watch something else pretty cool. Now administering eye drops to a big horse is not something I had ever considered before, thinking about touching a painful area and the legs flying towards me I realise that it does require careful thought. In this case a supraorbital (above the eye) lavage system is used. Basically a small incision is made into the upper eyelid and a tube passed through this which is then fixed in place along the head. This allows a syringe to be connected and drugs to be applied directly to the eye which I think is pretty cool and makes it easier.

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