The last class…

Mom watching over my shoulder during treatment of the foal

It feels like forever ago that I was excited for my first day of vet school (you can read about it here) and what a feeling it was. I’m a little nostalgic as I read over my diary as I was so much younger and way more naïve back then.

It is the opposite today though, I am coming towards the end of my time as a vet student and that is scary. Today was my last ever class as a vet student so I am going finish as I started.

My last block of vet school is equine, and today was rescheduled from one of the earlier bank holidays this month. The class today was the examination of the distal limb of the horse.

We started with nerve blocks and the anatomical location of the nerves and where to inject the local anaesthetic to block the nerve. This can be used as a very useful tool to identify where a problem is in a horses leg as when you block the pain the lameness will decrease or vanish completely. This allows you to start with nerve blocks lower down moving higher up until you get rid of the lameness and tells you where to focus the rest of the exam whether that is radiography, ultrasound or arthroscopy.

After this we moved to dissection of the leg, looking at all of the important structures and how they connect together with the muscles tendons and ligaments. The equine leg is pretty impressive with how much strength it has and how fast it can move. This is largely due to the structure of the tendons which act almost as springs when they are loaded with a force.

The class finished with a live horse to do ultrasound of the tendons within the leg. This is one of the most common exams in horses and one of the easiest ways to look for problems with the tendons. It is possible to see many of the structures of the leg on the ultrasound machine and for any injury to the tendon is an extremely accurate way to determine the degree of damage.

It was a great last class, which combined theory with practice.

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