How To Take Care Of Your Pedigree Pooch

happy-dog-problems

These days, more and more people are choosing to get their new pets from shelters – and let’s face it, that’s an incredible thing to do. Not only are you giving a home to an animal that really needs some love and care, but you’re also getting a pet that’s probably going to live a long time and be healthy. But not everyone wants to go for a shelter animal – if you want a specific breed, then you might just want to go for a pedigree pup. If that’s the case, here are a few tips that you might want to bear in mind…

Look For Breed Specific Problems

One of the biggest problems with buying a pedigree dog is that a lot of breeds have health problems that have been caused by unscrupulous breeders essentially breeding birth defects into them. French bulldogs and pugs often have breathing problems, while golden retrievers often suffer from hip issues. It’s important that you keep an eye on your dog carefully for any of these issues – take them for plenty of vet check ups, and educate yourself on the specific needs that your breed has.

breed specific problems

Keep Your Pup Healthy

Although your new dog is basically a member of your family, if you’ve spent a lot of money on him or her then you might be looking at them as an investment as well – that means that it’s all the more important to keep your new dog healthy. Make sure that you take them for all their jabs and vaccinations, and if you aren’t intending to use your dog for breeding then make sure you get them spayed. It’s important that you get the right food to keep them healthy. Some breeds even have specific food that’s good for them, like Royal Canin bulldog puppy food, which will be fab for your new bulldog baby. It’s important to make sure that your dog gets plenty of exercise – take them out as often as possible, and remember that large dogs like huskies and labradors will require a lot of exercise.

dalmatians-dog-animal-headKeep Your Dog Safe

There are two ways to keep your dog safe: firstly, make sure that you train them fully. Obedience classes can work wonders and will teach you how to be a good dog owner just as much as they teach your dog how to behave well. It’s important to make sure that your dog has good recall if you’re planning to let him or her off their leash on public, and it’s also important to make sure that they’re socialised well with other dogs so they don’t freak out whenever they encounter another dog when you’re out on walks. Secondly, you need to remember that some breeds are in high demand and can be targets for theft thanks to how much they’re worth. If you have one of those breeds, make sure that when they’re outside, they’re in your line of sight all the time – some thieves have been known to reach into people’s yards to steal their dogs.

Why do I need to cut? (Day –281)

Vet Student Operating

I enjoy surgery so much that it is almost a love, I find it so rewarding to be able to anesthetise an animal, and whilst it is sleeping fix it or stop the pain. For me it has been obvious for a while that my path will follow that of surgery, I’ve seen as much practice as I could with a focus on surgery. And I have spent every spare hour I have within the surgery department here.

Surgery is a massive thrill, the adrenaline rush of scrubbing in and picking up a scalpel is something that I am told will never vanish. And I love this. It makes me happy doing surgery, and it makes me feel fulfilled when the dog or cat or rabbit wakes up after surgery fixed. Well sometimes it is not so simple and there is a period of rehabilitation however every single day from the surgery the poor animal is getting better.

As I get better at surgery, my understanding and experience is deepening. Where before I looked for every opportunity to cut as a chance to do what I love and take the animal to surgery I am now not so fast to want this.

I was speaking about this with one of doctors the other day who told me that many years ago he was told that the art of surgery was not doing surgery, but knowing when to do surgery.

Something that has always bothered me is that sometimes surgery is simply to fix problems caused by humans. This came to a head for me on the Ophthalmology conference weekend when Professor Ron Ofri spoke about a surgeon walking out of surgery holding up a piece of skin he removed from a dogs forehead that stretched to the floor.

I asked the question – should we as vets be performing such surgery without requiring the castration or spaying of the animal at the same time? When a breeder has a litter of puppies that all require a visit to the ophthalmologist and surgery before they are a month old? Is this ok?

It’s not just the eyes though, another common surgery is for BOAS – Brachycephalic Obstructed Airway Syndrome – where part of the soft palate is cut away because it is too long and is stopping the dog from breathing properly. Often this is combined with plastic surgery to widen the nostrils which are too narrow.

Then there are dogs that have been bred so badly that they cannot give birth naturally. They can only be born by caesarean section.

Many years ago I read a book by a surgeon from America asked to present at a UK conference on castration implants in dogs – the press thought it was about plastic surgery and filled the entire room. And the surgeon lectured about the use of “implants” to replace the testicles removed during castration – he passed around some samples and one of the attendees mentioned how lifelike they felt to be told that the ones they had were the human version…

The outcry was because vets are not allowed to carry out cosmetic procedures on animals – this is why tail docking, ear clipping etc are all outlawed as cruel because they are cosmetic. Yet now the two cases above that I mentioned are commonly happening the press is silent.

Emma Milne recently did an amazing job of raising the issue of brachycephalic dogs such as pugs that cannot breathe properly as a welfare concern which got some media attention. Pedigree dogs exposed covered some of the crazy welfare issues. And yet at crufts a unhealthy German Shepherd was allowed to win.

I can cut, however the question will be whether ethically and morally I should cut. I believe if the deformity is so great as to require surgery than that animal should not be bred from. If by surgery I can relieve pain or suffering from the animal then it may be justified – however I believe that in this case the animal should be castrated or spayed before or at the same time.