How Not To Make A Dog’s Dinner Out Of Your Pooch’s Diet

dog diet

Every pet owner wants to take good care of their pet. Whether it is a cold or fleas, it is essential to fix the problem so that your dog isn’t in pain. However, there is one area where dog owners are not up to scratch: their pooch’s diet. Pets are like humans and need a balanced and tailored diet. With that in mind, the following tips are here to help. This is how not to make a dog’s dinner out of their diet.

Take Them To The Vet If There Are Problems Like Itchy Skin

Yes, going to the vet is expensive and a lot of hassle, but it is the only way you will find out about allergies and deficiencies. Like people, dogs are allergic to certain foods, or their stomachs can’t digest them as well as others. Obviously, you need to avoid these foods, but it isn’t possible if you don’t know what they are in the first place. By visiting the vet and asking for a food trial, intradermal skin test or a blood test, they will be able to tell which items in foods are good and which are bad.

Go Au Naturel

If in doubt, opting for organic food is always a good option. Natural dog food doesn’t contain any chemicals or unnecessary additives. Therefore, it shouldn’t be hard to digest or cause them to be sick. Plus, the natural ingredients will boost everything from their mood to their stamina. The key is to find truly natural food because there are suppliers who fudge the facts. A good tip is to take the label test. This means forget about the packaging, reputation, and PR and focus on the ingredients. What you are looking for is a high percentage of meat as well as soy protein and corn.

Introduce Human Meats

If your dog has ever been sick bets are a vet has recommended chicken and rice. This bland diet is good to help “reset” the digestive tract when they are ill. To get the most nutrients out of their diet, a dog needs a balanced diet which can be commercially made however treats can be given. With this in mind, don’t be afraid to introduce meat you would eat, such as beef. Of course, the protein in meat is an essential nutrient. But always do your research first and avoid chocolate as it is poisonous to most dogs.

But Don’t Cook It

Every time you have a piece of red meat it will go in the frying pan or the oven. Humans have evolved to need cooked meat as a part of their diet, yet dogs aren’t the same. Pretty much every other animal species on the planet requires meat, and they should have it raw. When you cook it, the meat loses its nutritional value and your dog won’t get the same benefits. Also, chewing raw meat is good for their teeth. However, stick to beef because poultry and pork can cause salmonella.

Ultimately, your dog’s diet is down to you, so please take the responsibility seriously.

Food prep, nutrition and the secret of omelettes

A golden omelette

Something I really hate is that even though we get taught nutrition, is that it is difficult to put it into practice when at vet school. So often it is easier to just grab stuff from the vending machine or sandwiches or crisps when running between patients.

It is ironical to me that I know this yet still suffer from this and so this week I decided that it was enough when I saw my weight on the scales… This week I tried to do food prep and eat better especially as I knew I’d have a few days off later in the week because of easter.

Loads of Tupperware which was on special offer in Tesco made this easier for me – a weeks’ worth of salads and lunches made my week more enjoyable… And I feel better.

Something I’ve always been bad at is omelettes, however it is good protein and relatively healthy for breakfast so I was determined to get them right this time. Especially as it only takes 10 minutes to cook them.

This week however I finally think I cracked the secret – I am generally impatient and have electric plates to cook on so never let these really get warm. I normally just tried to do it as quick as possible. However I think this was the start of my problems….

So my first tip in getting the perfect omelette is to warm up the plate – if you are lucky enough to have a gas hob this is not necessary.

My second tip is to use more oil than you would think you used – I hate cooking with oil and normally just tried to use butter. However I have some olive oil so tried this instead – the first couple of times it stuck – however on my later attempts I used a lot more oil and it worked better.

And my final tip is to let the oil get hot before adding the batter.

Following these steps has resulted in going from charcoal to golden omelettes like mine in this picture….

Strategies for dealing with obesity in small pets (Day 127)

Guinea Pig obesity and weight loss in small mammals

Today’s Diary Entry is sponsored by Supreme Pet Foods

Following on from last week where we looked at the problems of sugar and obesity in small animals today I want to look at strategies for dealing with obesity. To give a quick recap obesity is when an animal is more than 20% over their ideal body weight which is determined by using body condition scoring which takes into account the animals state of being (more on this later!).

Guinea Pig obesity and weight loss in small mammals

Anyways the first step is determining that your pet is overweight, generally with rabbits, guinea pigs and ferrets you should be able to feel the spine and ribs however these should not be visibly prominent. If you cannot feel these then your pet is probably overweight, depending on the amount it may be a good idea here to seek help from your vet. Lots of practices now run free “weight clinics” where you have a qualified nurse to talk you through nutrition and how best to manage your pets weight. Even if its not advertised for small animals like rabbits, guinea pigs, or ferrets if you talk to your practice most will actually accommodate your pet!

Now the golden rule to weight loss is that it should be slow and steady, if you decrease the amount of food too rapidly or skip a feeding then its possible for the animal to develop a life threatening condition known as hepatic lipidosis. This occurs when the body is forced to convert extreme amounts of body fat into energy causing a build up of fat cells in the liver preventing it from doing its normal functions (aka liver failure). If you suspect this you need to seek immediate emergency veterinary attention for your pet!

There are two factors in play here when it comes to nutrition; quantity and quality. As stated in the previous article you should be looking for foods which avoid high levels of sugar. Also consider what you are feeding, if it is a mix does your pet eat all of the food or are they just eating parts of it (known as selective feeding). It may be worth using different foods in combination to try and give a balanced diet. You should consider fruit to be a treat that is given once a week in tiny amounts as it contains loads of sugar. In addition you can also supplement this with daily fresh vegetables or herbs for example:

Rabbits: Look to feed leafy green veg and things like coriander or fresh mint

Guinea Pigs: As these are susceptible to bloat be cautious so dry hay or herbs and fibrous plants like dandelion leaves

As for quantity the first thing to do is look at how much you are feeding (weigh this!) and how much the instructions on the feed packaging says you should be feeding which can be an interesting comparison. If you are feeding more than you should start to reduce the amount gradually over 2 – 3 weeks.

Also consider how you give the food to your pet, things like using a feeding ball or scatter feeding can help increase activity and so burn more calories! I’ve got animal nutrition this coming semester so should be covering a lot more nutrition topics in more detail.