How To Take Care Of Your Pedigree Pooch

happy-dog-problems

These days, more and more people are choosing to get their new pets from shelters – and let’s face it, that’s an incredible thing to do. Not only are you giving a home to an animal that really needs some love and care, but you’re also getting a pet that’s probably going to live a long time and be healthy. But not everyone wants to go for a shelter animal – if you want a specific breed, then you might just want to go for a pedigree pup. If that’s the case, here are a few tips that you might want to bear in mind…

Look For Breed Specific Problems

One of the biggest problems with buying a pedigree dog is that a lot of breeds have health problems that have been caused by unscrupulous breeders essentially breeding birth defects into them. French bulldogs and pugs often have breathing problems, while golden retrievers often suffer from hip issues. It’s important that you keep an eye on your dog carefully for any of these issues – take them for plenty of vet check ups, and educate yourself on the specific needs that your breed has.

breed specific problems

Keep Your Pup Healthy

Although your new dog is basically a member of your family, if you’ve spent a lot of money on him or her then you might be looking at them as an investment as well – that means that it’s all the more important to keep your new dog healthy. Make sure that you take them for all their jabs and vaccinations, and if you aren’t intending to use your dog for breeding then make sure you get them spayed. It’s important that you get the right food to keep them healthy. Some breeds even have specific food that’s good for them, like Royal Canin bulldog puppy food, which will be fab for your new bulldog baby. It’s important to make sure that your dog gets plenty of exercise – take them out as often as possible, and remember that large dogs like huskies and labradors will require a lot of exercise.

dalmatians-dog-animal-headKeep Your Dog Safe

There are two ways to keep your dog safe: firstly, make sure that you train them fully. Obedience classes can work wonders and will teach you how to be a good dog owner just as much as they teach your dog how to behave well. It’s important to make sure that your dog has good recall if you’re planning to let him or her off their leash on public, and it’s also important to make sure that they’re socialised well with other dogs so they don’t freak out whenever they encounter another dog when you’re out on walks. Secondly, you need to remember that some breeds are in high demand and can be targets for theft thanks to how much they’re worth. If you have one of those breeds, make sure that when they’re outside, they’re in your line of sight all the time – some thieves have been known to reach into people’s yards to steal their dogs.

Don’t Make A Dog’s Dinner Out Of Your Puppy’s Upbringing

Training your puppy

Teaching your new puppy certain rules can be the most challenging thing any owner will face when it comes to their dog. Actually, training your dog to be obedient could be the most challenging thing any owner will ever face when it comes to life. It can be such a tedious process and one that you didn’t account for until you came home to find a fully chewed sofa and your best chews being used a dog toy. Somehow your puppy had even found a way to make your shoes squeak. As such, we have come up with a list of ways to help you in your search for obedience and manners, whatever the task at hand (or paw) may consist of.

Straight Off The Bat

The most crucial piece of advice we can give any puppy-owner is this: remember that a dog is a loyal companion. They love being with you, they love spending time with you and socialising with you. As such, any extended periods of confinement, including ignoring them, can have a negative effect on what you are trying to achieve. In fact, these type of ‘training’ will probably just lead to more destructive behaviour, louder barking and increased hyperactivity. In short, it will see them become a nuisance.

Basic Tips

Certain pieces of training advice are universal when it comes to training your puppy, or dog. The most universal is consistency. Always be consistent with your commands, and your rewards. What we mean is, don’t change up the word for sit, or heel, or anything like that. It will be confusing.

Another great tip to remember is that dogs love hearing their name, as such you should try using it a lot and often. However, don’t use their name whenever you are trying to reprimand your beloved pooch; only use it alongside actions that will grand a positive result, like rolling-over, albeit sitting is much more achievable.

When we say reward, be aware that this doesn’t necessarily mean a treat, or a doggy biscuit. It means attention and love and affection. Dogs will often crave this more than a little nibble on something tasty. Trust us. On this note, try and avoid giving your dog lots of attention whenever it misbehaves because, well, it will see this as a positive result to something naughty.

Do not reprimand your dog for urinating when it gets excited. This is a common trait in most dogs and it is involuntary. They’re simply recognising ou as their owner, and they love you so much they can’t contain themselves; so reprimanding them will only have a negative effect.

Try A Professional

If you’re having real problems housebreaking your pup, there are alternatives to stressing out and losing your mind. A great way to do this is to look out for any professional services that may be able to help you in your quest for good behavior, services such as a puppy daycare. Professionals have trained dogs before, lots of dogs, and so they will be able to communicate with your pup and inform you of what tricks seem to be most effective.

Training your dog professionally

My first castration surgery – a massive milestone… (Day 420)

First castration surgery vet student

Today’s Diary Entry is sponsored by Vet School Success

A quick diary entry today as it is a very big milestone in my journey to becoming a veterinary surgeon, I know I need to catch up on my diary however have exams both tommorow and Friday to study for as well.

So today I performed my first castration surgery on a living breathing animal!!! Whoooop!

First castration surgery vet student

Ok, now thats over with here are the details! I’m taking a class on small mammals which is a elective class (aka non-compulsory) as I believe these smaller creatures to be just as important as the larger ones. Today we were given the task of castrating some pet rats, now I know that its a common assumption that these are too small to operate on. However if you have ever had the pleasure of meeting a (uncastrated) male rat, I am sure that you will agree in terms of their body size they have relatively large balls.

So now talking in terms of castration it is a relatively simple and common procedure which is why I believe it is one of the first we learn. From a surgical perspective it is similar to that in cats. So diving off topic for a minute here something I feel important to highlight is that the surgical procedure between dogs and cats (and rats) is different. This is because of the position of the testicles in relation to the penis. In dogs there is space in front of the testicles to make an incision, whilst in cats (and rats) there is not.

The procedure in cats and rats therefore is different in that the incision is made directly into the scrotum over the testicle. Now anatomically there is a septum (or divider) within the scrotum mean each testicle sits in its own compartment which requires a seperate incision for each testicle. Once this cavity is opened and the testicle is exposed the vessels leading to it are ligated and then the vessels are cut. This is basically the ultimate test of the entire surgical procedure as if this is not done correctly then the vessels which are like elastic are pulled up into the abdomen and will bleed inside causing the death of the animal. Now once this is done, as rats are close to the ground the surgical site is closed with sutures to help prevent infection.

Now my procedure went fine, I did not have any additional bleeding and the closure was neat, with that I now need to study anatomy for tommorows test.