The Emergency Vet…

chris-learns-emergency-and-critical-care

Accidents can and will happen, most often when you are not expecting them, and medicine is not cheap. This is especially so when it happens when your normal vet is not open, as then you are often sent to a specialist emergency vet, which is almost like an A&E department for pets. The vets here are trained to save your pets life; in addition to specialist training they have access to the important equipment and drugs necessary to do this.

Over the next 4 days I have been invited to join Vets Now one of the UK’s leading providers of Emergency Centres for Pets that have been in accidents or are seriously ill. I’m excited to learn a lot of things to help with emergencies, yet I am apprehensive about how intense it will be and how little I know.

I’ve been invited into two different centres in two different cities so I can see a range of different patients and learn from several different vets.

The first centre I am at just for the weekend, expecting to be there from 12 lunchtime until 7pm Saturday evening. Then again all day on Sunday from 8:30am until evening again with night staff taking over to continue to provide the care needed.

The second centre I am on overnights on Monday and Tuesday from around 6pm until the next morning as the normal overnight shift is 15 hours long. This centre also takes patients from the PDSA charity so is expected to be a lot busier.

During this time I’ve been allowed to tweet – so keep an eye on my twitter feed @vetschooldiary for live updates from behind the scenes as it happens.

And off course I will be blogging my experience as well (potentially once I’ve managed to catch up on sleep!).