How Not To Make A Dog’s Dinner Out Of Your Pooch’s Diet

dog diet

Every pet owner wants to take good care of their pet. Whether it is a cold or fleas, it is essential to fix the problem so that your dog isn’t in pain. However, there is one area where dog owners are not up to scratch: their pooch’s diet. Pets are like humans and need a balanced and tailored diet. With that in mind, the following tips are here to help. This is how not to make a dog’s dinner out of their diet.

Take Them To The Vet If There Are Problems Like Itchy Skin

Yes, going to the vet is expensive and a lot of hassle, but it is the only way you will find out about allergies and deficiencies. Like people, dogs are allergic to certain foods, or their stomachs can’t digest them as well as others. Obviously, you need to avoid these foods, but it isn’t possible if you don’t know what they are in the first place. By visiting the vet and asking for a food trial, intradermal skin test or a blood test, they will be able to tell which items in foods are good and which are bad.

Go Au Naturel

If in doubt, opting for organic food is always a good option. Natural dog food doesn’t contain any chemicals or unnecessary additives. Therefore, it shouldn’t be hard to digest or cause them to be sick. Plus, the natural ingredients will boost everything from their mood to their stamina. The key is to find truly natural food because there are suppliers who fudge the facts. A good tip is to take the label test. This means forget about the packaging, reputation, and PR and focus on the ingredients. What you are looking for is a high percentage of meat as well as soy protein and corn.

Introduce Human Meats

If your dog has ever been sick bets are a vet has recommended chicken and rice. This bland diet is good to help “reset” the digestive tract when they are ill. To get the most nutrients out of their diet, a dog needs a balanced diet which can be commercially made however treats can be given. With this in mind, don’t be afraid to introduce meat you would eat, such as beef. Of course, the protein in meat is an essential nutrient. But always do your research first and avoid chocolate as it is poisonous to most dogs.

But Don’t Cook It

Every time you have a piece of red meat it will go in the frying pan or the oven. Humans have evolved to need cooked meat as a part of their diet, yet dogs aren’t the same. Pretty much every other animal species on the planet requires meat, and they should have it raw. When you cook it, the meat loses its nutritional value and your dog won’t get the same benefits. Also, chewing raw meat is good for their teeth. However, stick to beef because poultry and pork can cause salmonella.

Ultimately, your dog’s diet is down to you, so please take the responsibility seriously.

To feed or not to feed (Day -290)

Veterinary Nutrition Education

There are many brands of different dog and cat foods out there, yet often it is Royal Canin that you see in a veterinary practice. After a random conversation with a friend I decided that I should share some of the reasons why it is Royal Canin you often see in vet practices.

Making a pet food is easy, there are no licenses required, and it takes very little to give a list of requirements to a food manufacturer along with the label you want on it. There are production lines that are available to rent out to run smaller batches so companies without their own factories can produce and sell food. There is possibility that food is also white label with the only difference between the two foods on the shelf being the container label and the price.

There are different types of formulation – you can have fixed formulation where the same ingredients are used every time the food is produced so it is the same each time you buy it. Or you can have dynamic formulation where the ingredients are calculated based on material price so the actual ingredients may be completely different each time. This is why sometimes a dog or cat will pass up food even if it is the “same” as normal.

Many of the larger companies have their own factories so that it only produces their food. This allows for strict quality control – for example Royal Canin does DNA analysis on key points within its production line.

Then there is the research that goes into a food – for example Royal Canin own laboratories and research centres. These look at things such as the shape of the food to the shape of the animals teeth, the hardness of the food and how much pressure is put onto teeth to break it up. Then there is extra research into the digestion and excretion of food – measuring how much is in the urine and faeces. There is also research into the growth and the nutrients needed at the different stages of life.

Research into disease to treat specific conditions is also a big part – just like in humans animals can have food sensitivity. There have been major breakthroughs with decreasing food allergies which can cause much distress for patients. Research by Royal Canin showed that the immune response is regulated by the size of the foreign protein particle. From this Royal Canin found the smallest usable and sustainable protein that was possible and used this to make a food that provides nutrition yet is small enough to hide from the immune system so does not have an immune response.

Education is also important – the successful larger companies that you tend to see advertised produce books, share research, and provide training for vets and vet nurses. They give the knowledge needed to know which food should be used and when in different stages of life, and in different disease processes.

This is why these foods end up on the shelfs in vet practices, because they are backed by research, they are trusted with the ingredients known, and they make the effort to educate the vets using them.

Food prep, nutrition and the secret of omelettes

A golden omelette

Something I really hate is that even though we get taught nutrition, is that it is difficult to put it into practice when at vet school. So often it is easier to just grab stuff from the vending machine or sandwiches or crisps when running between patients.

It is ironical to me that I know this yet still suffer from this and so this week I decided that it was enough when I saw my weight on the scales… This week I tried to do food prep and eat better especially as I knew I’d have a few days off later in the week because of easter.

Loads of Tupperware which was on special offer in Tesco made this easier for me – a weeks’ worth of salads and lunches made my week more enjoyable… And I feel better.

Something I’ve always been bad at is omelettes, however it is good protein and relatively healthy for breakfast so I was determined to get them right this time. Especially as it only takes 10 minutes to cook them.

This week however I finally think I cracked the secret – I am generally impatient and have electric plates to cook on so never let these really get warm. I normally just tried to do it as quick as possible. However I think this was the start of my problems….

So my first tip in getting the perfect omelette is to warm up the plate – if you are lucky enough to have a gas hob this is not necessary.

My second tip is to use more oil than you would think you used – I hate cooking with oil and normally just tried to use butter. However I have some olive oil so tried this instead – the first couple of times it stuck – however on my later attempts I used a lot more oil and it worked better.

And my final tip is to let the oil get hot before adding the batter.

Following these steps has resulted in going from charcoal to golden omelettes like mine in this picture….