The end of my first week of clinics….

Endoscopy Gutteral Pouch Empyema in Horses

Today’s Diary Entry is sponsored by Supreme Pet Foods

What a week! I am actually starting to feel like a vet student now and not only have started to apply knowledge that I have learnt over the past year but also from my previous degree! In addition to this I have also managed to pass two exams this week (Veterinary Physiology on Wednesday and Animal Hygiene this morning)!!!

So this morning started with an exam, it still feels weird to me having to dress formal for exams however dressing smart also gives me a boost of confidence so I do like it. I now have a week to prepare for my Anatomy exam on the 24th June – this will be my second attempt as I failed my first one back in January as I had no clue what to expect on the question paper. Basically you are expected to just list the different parts of the bone instead of trying to write a description of how it looks 🙂 Hopefully I will do better this time!

Now this week has been pretty cool, I’ve got through a lot of Equine stuff, seen a castration, endoscopy, and wound management. Today I was slightly gutted as I arrived late after this mornings exam to find that they had done emergency surgery on a corneal ulcer (a ulcer of the eye) in a sports horse. I arrived just in time to see the movement of the horse from the operating table to the recovery box. This was interesting as when animals wake up from anaesthetic they are unsteady on their feet (same in humans but we have the ability to know what is going on and that we should lay there) and usually struggle to stand. On Tuesday for example the horse was held on the ground until he had recovered enough to stand, and then was supported with people at the head and tail vertebra. The rest of today’s surgery went to the wound management of the hoof injuries, and endoscopy lavage for the guttural pouch empyema (the bump in the image below is a large swollen abscess).

Endoscopy Gutteral Pouch Empyema in HorsesStandard treatment for corneal ulcers is applying a graft which helps healing whilst also preventing the eye from rupturing, and whilst I missed this I got to watch something else pretty cool. Now administering eye drops to a big horse is not something I had ever considered before, thinking about touching a painful area and the legs flying towards me I realise that it does require careful thought. In this case a supraorbital (above the eye) lavage system is used. Basically a small incision is made into the upper eyelid and a tube passed through this which is then fixed in place along the head. This allows a syringe to be connected and drugs to be applied directly to the eye which I think is pretty cool and makes it easier.

The start of Veterinary Embryology… (Day 218)

Histology of the eye section of the retina

Today’s Diary Entry is sponsored by Pets Bureau

For those that don’t know what embryology is; it is the growth of an animal after fertilisation of an egg (ovum) by sperm (or in the case of some species self-fertilisation). The sperm and egg fuse together with the haploid DNA contained in each combining to form diploid DNA within the nucleus. This single cell the goes on to rapidly divide multiple times with the number of cells doubling with each division (2-4-8-16 etc). Talking simply, this then folds in on itself (invaginates) to form a tube through the middle which will later become the digestive system. At this stage 3 different layers are formed; the ectoderm which is the outer later, the mesoderm which is the middle layer and the internal layer which is the endoderm. The cells in each of these layers are then differentiated to form different organs and structures related to that part of the body – for example the ectoderm forms the majority of the skin.

After embryology we then had the histology lecture that we had missed previously on the senses and today looked at the eye and ear. Personally I think the eye is amazing as the cells here are some of the fastest replicating cells within the body – most injuries to the surface layer heal within hours! The retina is the part of the back of the eye that is responsible for processing images into nerve pulses for the brain to understand and under the microscope looks like this…

Histology of the eye section of the retina

Looking at it quickly the layer at the top which is thick forms the fibres that holds the eye together known as the choroid and is attached to the sclera. Under this we then have a layer of pigment before the layer of rods and cones with the associated ganglionic nerve structures.

We finished this afternoon with our Physiology lecture which was looking at the brain, this is something so complex that by the end of the lecture most of use had our head aches. As vets we need to understand how different signals are processed, and the areas of the brain that deal with different functions of the body. In fact if we wanted we could actually progress to become Veterinary Neurosurgeons…. Is that cool or what?!?!